From De Kooning to Dice: Highlights from 40 years of Aspen Art

Dice-Yutaka_Sone-Aspen_Buttermilk-Art-Museum.jpg

The Aspen Art Museum is celebrating 40 years this summer with a host of special events. If you’re a long-time local, or just getting up to speed with the Aspen art scene, Andrew Travers’ “24 Moments that Defined the Aspen Art Museum” is a great recap of all the ups and downs the museum has seen over the years. From humble begins to major art scene player it is today, the institution’s story runs rather parallel to contemporary art in general.

One of our favorite moments was the giant dice that artist Yutaka Sone rolled down the Buttermilk half pipe on a grey winter day in 2006. It didn’t quite go as expected, but of course, such can happen when you put art in, “Unexpected Places.”

Aspen Gets a New Museum and a New Ballet

Herbert-Bayer-Museum-Aspen-Ballet.png

The Aspen Institute announced a new museum will be erected to house and celebrate the work of artist Herbert Bayer who lived in Aspen from 1946 to 1975 and among many other projects, designed the Institute Campus, the music tent, and the original Sundeck. (Watch this short video on the history here). 

Audiences are in for a surprise this summer when ASFB premieres its first-ever evening-length ballet: long-time collaborator Nicolo Fonte’s Beautiful Decay. Featuring an original set design by Tony Award-winner Mimi Lien, and the timeless music of Vivaldi’s Four Seasons and Max Richter’s reinterpretation of the same, this haunting work juxtaposes daring athleticism against the reality of aging.

Co-Working Workers Unite!

Screen Shot 2019-07-09 at 11.47.18 AM.png

The internet promised us a new freedom to live and work where ever we please. This has come true, sort of, not really. One thing is for sure ... where ever we go, the work tends to find us. So why not have a nice place to do it? 

Whether on vacation and needing a quiet space for a conference call or are looking for an office in town, the newly opened ALT/Aspen is at your service. Memberships are flex and the facilities are excellent. Co-Working has finally arrived in Aspen.

Real Tossers: Who Has The Best Salad in Aspen?

monarch_ceasar_3179.jpg

While restaurants are usually measured by their proteins—surfs, turfs, fishes and fouls—it’s the deceptively simple salad that keeps ‘em coming back. And in a town where appetites are as prodigious as the entrées, the question is: who tosses the best salad in Aspen?

Here are our top five:

6. JUS: Spinach Salad

Menu Description: Organic hand pulled chicken, spinach, cherries, manchego cheese, cherry tomatoes, red onion, served with a homemade champagne vinaigrette.

Notes: Tucked away inside the Ute City Building, this little health food spot doesn’t have much by way of ambience, but the food is fresh, organic and delicious. The chicken always tastes like it came right off the carcass and mixed with the cheese and champagne vinaigrette make for the best salad available out of a plastic container.

White House Tavern

White House Tavern

5. & 4. White House Tavern: Kale Salad with Rotisserie Chicken and the Macho Salad

Menu Descriptions:  

  • Roasted peanut vinaigrette, fresh herbs, grated Reggiano

  • Mixed greens, avocado, dates, goat cheese, toasted almonds, freshly shucked corn

Notes: White House Tavern is comfort food central and well worth the wait at this no-rez staple. If you can resist the crispy chicken sandwich or French dip, these chicken salads manage to be both hearty and heavenly. 

3. L’Hosteria: Insalata di Cavolo e Barbabietole 

Menu Description: Kale and red beet salad, almonds, goat cheese, sautéed cherry tomatoes, basil pesto.

Notes: Locals know that this restaurant is all about the bar menu. During the off season, the main dining room often stands open while locals crowd around the bar. Their delectable kale and red beet insalata is a fine start to any meal. 

Monarch

Monarch

2. Monarch: Table-Side Caesar

Menu Description: Hearts of romaine, crouton, white anchovy, parmesan 

Notes: You may baulk at the very Aspen forty-dollar price, but the pomp and circumstance of Monarch’s table side caesar is well worth it. You can really see how good ingredients and a big bowl are all you need to get the job done.

Matsu

Matsu

1. Matsuhisa: Baby Spinach Salad With Dried Miso and Grilled Shrimp

There is something truly exceptional about this confection of spinach leafs, truffle oil, yuzu juice, grated parmesan, deep-fried leeks, dried red miso and exactly five grilled shrimp. Light, but filling, simple but decadent, it is a very special salad for a very special town. 

 

What Does Queen Anne Have To Do with Aspen's Queen Anne Architecture? Much Like the Monarch, It’s All a Bit ... Squishy

Left:    Sardy House ($23M)    Center:    Olivia Coleman as Queen Anne in "‘The Favourite’    Right: a         Queen Anne Cottage for sale.

Left: Sardy House ($23M) Center: Olivia Coleman as Queen Anne in "‘The Favourite’ Right: a Queen Anne Cottage for sale.

1702: Anne, Queen of Great Britain ascends to the throne during a period when the whole, “heir and a spare,” tradition was not going well. Her uncle had the thrown (no heir) so then her father ascended (but was overthrown). Then her older sister, Mary, co-ruled with her husband (that would be William and Mary, like the school) — but they never had kids; so it passed to Anne … who had no children.

Left:    Poulton House built during Queen Anne’s reign –    characterized by strongly bilateral symmetry with an Italianate or Palladian-derived pediment on the front formal elevation. Right: Portrait of Anne, Queen of Great Britain.

Left: Poulton House built during Queen Anne’s reign – characterized by strongly bilateral symmetry with an Italianate or Palladian-derived pediment on the front formal elevation. Right: Portrait of Anne, Queen of Great Britain.

Queen Anne Revival: UK Edition. Notice the corner tower and asymmetry.

Queen Anne Revival: UK Edition. Notice the corner tower and asymmetry.

1870-ish: The “Queen Anne Revival: UK Edition,” is invented by some popular architects around 1870 and its provenance and definition is murky. A potpourri of styles all mashed together, they called it, “Queen Anne Revival,” not so much because it had to do with anything revived from her short reign, but because that first decade of the 18th-century stirred an image of an idyllic English yesteryear. It would be like if today you created a style of house that mixed American Colonial with ‘70s ranch house and called it, “Eisenhower Revival.”

1876: Right around that time, America held its first World’s Fair, and American builders became obsessed with the fancy new style over from England. The Queen Anne Style went off in America like a house on fire, especially in the West.

Queen Anne architecture in Aspen

Queen Anne architecture in Aspen

U.S. architects took the English style and ran with it, creating some truly wild adaptations. America was new-money central and nothing spelled “bling” better than ornamented woodworking. It would make sense that Aspen, flush with silver at the time, would be a Queen Anne town

1900: In particular, the “Queen Anne Cottage” (a sub-genre of the Queen Anne Rival American House) worked well in Aspen, as one can dress up a relatively simple wood-framed house without the intense bother of stone work. Today, the remaining Queen Anne cottages are a far cry from the symmetrical manor houses of 17th / 18th-century England, but we like to think Her Majesty would enjoy their colorful charms nonetheless.  

Read more about the one currently listed for sale.